Hunting gear for the newbie

longbowhunter2

Well-Known Member
Oct 16, 2013
3,230
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#1
LOL, I am probably opening a can of worms. Well let the constructive
Criticism start. Hey some times got to think out of the box.
Plus I have time to stir up the dust.
Here goes

If You are thinking about this sport, hobby what ever it is.
There no one fix for eveury one.

This is as complex scenario.
If the pocket book is limited.
And you want to start some how.
These are my thoughts.
Firearms manufacturing and design has really improve.
Let say there are way better experts than myself.
But let me say that I know enough to be dangerous. LOL.
Entry level rifles that are inexpensive but not junk, and are amazing. If your not sure if this sport is for you and the pocket book is problem or an issue.
All entry level rifles will kill deer at
Within 300 yards easily.
Or that entry level shot gun will
Get the job done. It will get you out
There.
But don't skip on the glass. Both rifle scope and binoculars.
Buy inexpensive but good quality.
It will get you out there to start out.
Now before my compadres start getting riled up. Let me say this.
One of my fault is being modest but not cheap. I made mistakes
I got the job done but I could have done or been better. Raising a family is not easy. As well as every one else had good times and bad luck with the economy.
SO if you can afford it buy the best you can afford.
One of my fault is this.
While I had the chance and the opportunity may present it self.
Is invest in a good quality equipment.
High precision well built rifle.
And higher end MOA or Mil Rad scope. Reloading equipment and supplies. Buy the best that one's pocket book will allow.
But it is not necessary to start this sport.
Hunting boots and clothing is as important as rifle or even more.
One way to spoil a hunt is to have sore feet, and get wet, and get hypothermia. Trust me it sucks the big one. Just wear untreated leather boots in wet freezing weather and you will know what I mean.
Been there done that it sucked.
Freezing toes is not pleasant.
Stay dry and warm or stay cool and hydrated. Your safety and well being Trump's All other requirements. But it doesn't have to cost a fortune. Same as before
Buy the best you can afford.
I am different than most. I started
Very low tech. Very minimal.
And I scored almost every time.
In my life time except for when i
Took a break from hunting I had a high success rate.
Age factor, how well in shape you are. Ones skill, and patience all factor in too of course.
Good luck and good fortune.
Longbowhunter2
 
May 17, 2018
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San Diego
#2
Any recommendations for an inexpensive pack to start out with? Do I need a certain type to pack out a deer? I know they have some crazy expensive ones with load shelves and other gizmos but I am new and trying to budget where I can. I can't seem to wrap my head around the $500 packs out there and boots. I know it's worth investing in stuff like that but I'm not in the position to spend that much now..nor anytime soon.
 

Truduct

Well-Known Member
Dec 20, 2014
1,742
989
113
#3
Any recommendations for an inexpensive pack to start out with? Do I need a certain type to pack out a deer? I know they have some crazy expensive ones with load shelves and other gizmos but I am new and trying to budget where I can. I can't seem to wrap my head around the $500 packs out there and boots. I know it's worth investing in stuff like that but I'm not in the position to spend that much now..nor anytime soon.
Slumberjack makes some nice packs that are inexpensive.
 

ilovesprig

Moderator
Staff member
Aug 3, 2012
7,800
2,394
113
Escondido
#4
Horto,

Check out Wal-Mat's website.....I just got back from Montana and they had some really nice gear at reasonable prices (including meat packs for 98 bucks).

And I'm with you on the super expensive stuff.....That gear has never made me shoot better, hunt better, or get more game (my Swaro's & Benelli's excepted).
 
Last edited:
Oct 16, 2013
3,230
703
113
63
on the mountain
#5
Here is a link for good reviews
Now far as back packs go .
There a lot of fellas here who have
A lot more personal experience with packs that can carry debone deer.
If that is what you are after.
Here is a link with 2018 review.
Post some questions and a ton of folk here will reply.
I usually carry or drag my deer.
But the current method more folk
Are debone and carry in a pack.
All the pros are going this way.

https://pickabow.com/best-hunting-backpack/
Post some back packs and ask a lot of questions. Truduct and Ilovesprig
Gave good starts.
The packs I have I like to try them on before I buy them. To see if it feels comfortable, and is right for my style.
LB
 
Likes: Horto619
Jan 19, 2015
90
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#9
Any recommendations for an inexpensive pack to start out with? Do I need a certain type to pack out a deer? I know they have some crazy expensive ones with load shelves and other gizmos but I am new and trying to budget where I can. I can't seem to wrap my head around the $500 packs out there and boots. I know it's worth investing in stuff like that but I'm not in the position to spend that much now..nor anytime soon.
IMO if a Kuiu, Mystery Ranch or EXO hunting pack is not in the budget get a 60L or more high quality "REI" type pack. This will be a pack that tree huggers would use on multi day trips but it will hold all your gear for a day trip and a quartered D zone buck. Mystery Ranch makes these as well also Gregory and others. Camo is not needed for your pack just a design and materials that won't kill you or fall apart with a heavy load. Get the right size for your waist and torso, load it to 65lbs or so and adjust every strap on it per the instructions. Optics Planet has some good closeouts right now.
 
Oct 16, 2013
3,230
703
113
63
on the mountain
#11
IMO if a Kuiu, Mystery Ranch or EXO hunting pack is not in the budget get a 60L or more high quality "REI" type pack. This will be a pack that tree huggers would use on multi day trips but it will hold all your gear for a day trip and a quartered D zone buck. Mystery Ranch makes these as well also Gregory and others. Camo is not needed for your pack just a design and materials that won't kill you or fall apart with a heavy load. Get the right size for your waist and torso, load it to 65lbs or so and adjust every strap on it per the instructions. Optics Planet has some good closeouts right now.
Well done mud pigeon
Experience is valuable.
 
Oct 16, 2013
3,230
703
113
63
on the mountain
#19
I make something similar.
Except for one person.
I field dress then tie it's legs together. I cut myself a study stick
Pull out my high tensile strength
Cordage. Tie each end of the stick then cut enough slack to the deer's legs and head. That way I can drag it by my self if it's to heavy to carry.
Or pull it in tight spots.
Wrapping the deer with a small light
Wieght tarp. Helps dragging and keep it clean.