Federal 308 150 grain copper?

ke1234567

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Anyone have issues using Federal .308, in 150 grain (copper Power Shok) for deer? I have a couple boxes left and would like to just use it up (not at the range!), but it has been suggested to pick up a matchgrade ammo (Barnes, hornady, nosler, etc.) Just for background, my ethical shooting range is probably going to be inside of 275.
 
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Truduct

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Watched a pig get taken at 200yds with a 30-06 same size bullet federal power shock. It went maybe 10 yds before it piled up. Seems to kill stuff good and he had decent groups at 100.
 

ke1234567

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Santa Clarita, CA
Thanks. I have a feeling i should not have a problem with the ammo, as long as its a well placed shot. I think my friend's concern is that it won't be as consistent as matchgrade, which I agree. However, any inconsistency is likely only going to be within an inch or two, at that distance, and thus, I don't think it'll be a huge issue.
 
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ke1234567

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Truduct, i agree with the paper plate, but a small one. I'm trying to avoid any issues of not putting the animal down, so I try for a pretty small group, at least at 200 yds. I guess my friend is worried about the inconsistency of non-match grade ammo. But that should only make a difference for long-range shooting, meaning, beyond 400-500 yards
 
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Truduct

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I don’t understand what you mean by Matchgrade ammo. Hunting rounds are not match grade. There are some that are better than others but they are not match grade. If you can shoot a 1 MOA group at 100 you will be fine at the ranges you are looking at. Honestly the federal s might shoot better than the Barnes out of your rifle.
 

Kellendv

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I don’t understand what you mean by Matchgrade ammo. Hunting rounds are not match grade. There are some that are better than others but they are not match grade. If you can shoot a 1 MOA group at 100 you will be fine at the ranges you are looking at. Honestly the federal s might shoot better than the Barnes out of your rifle.
I was going to post the same. You need to purchase ammo that is loaded with a bullet that is designed for hunting, which your power shock ammo is. “Match grade” ammo is for target shooting. Many of those long bullets with very high BC’s that are used for high level competition are not ideal for hunting, although the two categories are blending these days with the popularity of long range hunting. Factory ammunition is really reliable these days. Your copper power shocks are going to do fine within your stated comfortable ranges. If you can shoot them well stick with them, if not try the Barnes. Before I switched to Barnes a few years ago I shot 20 dollar a box Remington Core-Lokt ammo. Sub-MOA in my Tikka. “The deadliest mushroom in the woods.”
 

JakeSCH

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This ammo works great and have taken deer with my .308 150 grain at 300 yards. My tikka shoots it better than most of the more expensive copper bullets but be mindful that it does have a significantly lower BC.
 
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Kellendv

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be mindful that it does have a significantly lower BC.
Ballistic coefficient has nothing to do with reliability, accuracy, or repeatability (for a given projectile). Ballistic coefficient is a numerical representation of drag. It gives you an idea of how efficiently a projectile moves through the air. A lower BC does not mean a projectile is less accurate, it just means it slows down more quickly compared to a projectile of the same weight with a higher BC.

Here’s an example: I used to shoot Remington CoreLokt 130 grain out of my Tikka. Now I shoot Barnes Vortx 130 grain. They both had a published velocity of 3060 FPS at the muzzle. They both shoot MOA, but the point of impact is significantly different. Now, I did not chronograph them to compare actual muzzle velocity from my rifle, but assuming they are equal or close to it the only explanation for the difference in point of impact is the difference in BC. The rem has a BC of .336 and the Barnes has a BC of .392.

Pick a good ammo with a good bullet designed for hunting and focus on shooting your gun with your chosen ammo well and you’ll find success.
 

JakeSCH

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Ballistic coefficient has nothing to do with reliability, accuracy, or repeatability (for a given projectile). Ballistic coefficient is a numerical representation of drag. It gives you an idea of how efficiently a projectile moves through the air. A lower BC does not mean a projectile is less accurate, it just means it slows down more quickly compared to a projectile of the same weight with a higher BC.

Here’s an example: I used to shoot Remington CoreLokt 130 grain out of my Tikka. Now I shoot Barnes Vortx 130 grain. They both had a published velocity of 3060 FPS at the muzzle. They both shoot MOA, but the point of impact is significantly different. Now, I did not chronograph them to compare actual muzzle velocity from my rifle, but assuming they are equal or close to it the only explanation for the difference in point of impact is the difference in BC. The rem has a BC of .336 and the Barnes has a BC of .392.

Pick a good ammo with a good bullet designed for hunting and focus on shooting your gun with your chosen ammo well and you’ll find success.
BC has an a significant impact on effective range of a bullet...for example I use the 168 grain ttsx (BC .470) with doesn’t drop below 2000 FPS until ~450 yards while the copper (BC .278) drops below 2000 FPS 300 yards...the Barnes leaves the rifle at ~140 FPS slower.
 

Kellendv

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BC has an a significant impact on effective range of a bullet...for example I use the 168 grain ttsx (BC .470) with doesn’t drop below 2000 FPS until ~450 yards while the copper (BC .278) drops below 2000 FPS 300 yards...the Barnes leaves the rifle at ~140 FPS slower.
Yes... that’s another way of explaining drag. I am responding to the OP’s stated range limitation. Obviously a bullet with more drag will slow down sooner. Also in general I would use energy numbers to determine effective range.
 

longbowhunter2

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A bullet with a crappy BC will start tumbling sooner, thus has less effective range accuracy. But density, and bullet geometry .
Since copper has less density than lead. It will run out of steam sooner.
Of course the load has a lot to do with it.. that's why you folks that reload have better results..
Of course addition to bullet seat and over all length. And then bla bla bla lol......
 

Lungpopper

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A bullet with a crappy BC will start tumbling sooner, thus has less effective range accuracy. But density, and bullet geometry .
Since copper has less density than lead. It will run out of steam sooner.
Of course the load has a lot to do with it.. that's why you folks that reload have better results..
Of course addition to bullet seat and over all length. And then bla bla bla lol......
Haha. You’re 50% correct. I’ll let you do the homework.
 
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