How are you guys seeing so many deer?...!!!!

Eric pecan

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Jun 11, 2013
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Vermonster said:
Goo stuff guys. I have a further question. How long do you guys scan a certain ridge, valley, etc., before moving on? In other words, how long before you are confident there are no deer in that area? Shoild I be bino'ing one area for 10 minutes, half hour, hour? Do you cover less area, but really dig into it, or quick looks, and cover more ground?

Here is what i do when glassing a hillside .I divide it into a grid. glass every sector thoroughly look for parts of a deer , ear movement etc. then move five to ten feet either left or right and do it again. you will be surprise what you dont see in one spot to another. usually glass one hillside two to tree hours before i move to a new spot.
 
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longbowhunter2

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Bump, I read every post. It's a very good Refresher . Because of health reasons I am changing back to my old ways. More watching and less hiking. The issue for most is time. Time is the limiting factor. That has changed for me. Patience is a virtue. I have lots of time.
As a young man I was told to sit in a excellent spot with good deer habitat. Every weekend. And watched the same spot every week end
Most of the time I was successful. Patience was the key. Well concealed. With very little movement. Years ago I did a test. Watching a doe for a while she was unaware of my presence. I snapped a small twig. Very lightly. she instantly looked right at me. But because I well concealed could not tell what I was.
So just think about that when hiking. A deer can hear you way before you know it's there. Remember deer hunting is all about the three's,
Location, location location.
 
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The wind was in my favor and I walked within 15 yards of these 2 ladies. They knew something was up, but they decided to hunker down. Once the wind changed direction and they heard my steps in the gravel, bye, bye in a split second . The temp was 107 so I called it a good day. deer 1.png deer 2.png deer 3.png
 

longbowhunter2

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longbowhunter2

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Here is good read , deer stalking methods.

https://www.grandviewoutdoors.com/b...o-spot-and-stalk-hunting-deer-on-public-land/
Deer hunting is a continuous learning factor. I am always reading and talking to other hunters.
As an engineer I was always updating my skills. So what ever you do doesn't matter. But continuous improvement. There is no one cookie cutter situation. But each warrants a different solution.
Best to all
Longbow

Best of luck
 

longbowhunter2

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This post is for newbies on this board.
I am so guilty of this my self. And it takes will power and patience.
I am not best here on the board
But I want to pass what I know.

So if you are not seeing deer!
But you know there is deer there.
Eg game cams, scouting and see lots of tracks, and scat.
Regardless of the method, philosophy, style of hunting.
If long range , medium range or short range. Finding game is the game.
You are hiking to fast.
If you start to sweat you are going to fast.
If you are walking/hiking at a continuous pace you are going to fast.
That said there is no hard rule.
For instance of someone wants to get to the top of a hill or mountain.
That's ok. Just play the game.
Wind, no noise, and such.
But once in the area where deer are.
Snail pace, stop and look, stop an look,
Medium and long range hunting is more for giving but to my opinion just as tedious.
Get up high be quiet and scan for hours. My M.O. is more ambush.
Natural blind or deer stand.
Spot and Stalk.
Smell and Noise are the enemy.
Most of my kills have been less than150 yards with cheap used rifle.
Peep site, with no obtics.
So at that time I had no choice.
I needed to get close.
My personal opinion is medium range and long range is actually
Requires less stalking skills but
Some of the fellas may feel driffrent.
But that is my opinion.
One must thoroughly scan everything. Especially shaded areas. Look for the slightest movement. Mine is looking for those large ears. Twitching ears gives them away. Patches of white, or black. And so on.
Hike slow and look.
You will see deer.
Or scan everything until one cannot stand it any more.
I have sat for hours in one stand. That was my M.O.
But does take time.
Spot and Stalk will find more deer. And to me is very exciting.
Fool the big game.:)
Best to all
Longbow 11855715_10204947399833019_6109840860049379610_n.jpg
 
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SurfNHuntSD

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Nice, Lee. I by no means put the hurt on deer as much as other guys on here, but I've had more success the last few years after learning some tips on this forum and from some more seasoned buddies. In my newbie days I would get pretty frustrated and nearly quit deer season after seeing almost no deer.. few does and certainly no bucks. Here's a few things, some no brainers, that I learned along the way.

At first I thought a good strategy was to sit low around the edge of the meadow waiting for deer to walk out. While this can happen and I've seen deer taken this way, on public land it seems everyone has this same idea. At a popular spot a few years back, I once glassed 8 hunters sitting around the same meadow. I knew my chances were slim doing that. So, with the advice of many on here, I moved up higher and the action started picking up for me. What surprised me was how many deer I started seeing moving through thick brush on steep hillsides, something I would've never seen sitting down low in that meadow with everyone else. And the advice is true regarding glassing technique... scan your surroundings in a grid-like pattern, which only works on a steady rest. I was blown away by how many deer I had probably missed in previous years because I was crashing around the brush and glassing indiscriminately. Our deer here, especially the bucks it seems, really know how to blend in. You're looking for parts of deer.. the sun shining off an antler, the flutter of a tail, the unmistakable ears.

And maybe the most important advice I'd gotten, which seems like a no brainer, is to hunt where the deer are (duh). I previously thought spots might be good because I occasionally bumped a doe or two in the offseason, but when it came time to hunt, nothing was there. So I kept scouting and found better spots with heavier deer trails and herds of does. And although bucks might've been few, I knew as long as the does were there in numbers, the boys would have to follow at some point.
 

longbowhunter2

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Oct 16, 2013
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Nice, Lee. I by no means put the hurt on deer as much as other guys on here, but I've had more success the last few years after learning some tips on this forum and from some more seasoned buddies. In my newbie days I would get pretty frustrated and nearly quit deer season after seeing almost no deer.. few does and certainly no bucks. Here's a few things, some no brainers, that I learned along the way.

At first I thought a good strategy was to sit low around the edge of the meadow waiting for deer to walk out. While this can happen and I've seen deer taken this way, on public land it seems everyone has this same idea. At a popular spot a few years back, I once glassed 8 hunters sitting around the same meadow. I knew my chances were slim doing that. So, with the advice of many on here, I moved up higher and the action started picking up for me. What surprised me was how many deer I started seeing moving through thick brush on steep hillsides, something I would've never seen sitting down low in that meadow with everyone else. And the advice is true regarding glassing technique... scan your surroundings in a grid-like pattern, which only works on a steady rest. I was blown away by how many deer I had probably missed in previous years because I was crashing around the brush and glassing indiscriminately. Our deer here, especially the bucks it seems, really know how to blend in. You're looking for parts of deer.. the sun shining off an antler, the flutter of a tail, the unmistakable ears.

And maybe the most important advice I'd gotten, which seems like a no brainer, is to hunt where the deer are (duh). I previously thought spots might be good because I occasionally bumped a doe or two in the offseason, but when it came time to hunt, nothing was there. So I kept scouting and found better spots with heavier deer trails and herds of does. And although bucks might've been few, I knew as long as the does were there in numbers, the boys would have to follow at some point.
Excellent write up Jason
Thank you for your comments.
Best
Longbow
 
D

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All great info guys, I will for sure note some of these tips down.

Things I've noticed...
If a buck is bumped and not really spooked that bad (you didn't scream.. A BUCK! A BUCK! to your buddy across the ravine) they might stay close by but are a very jumpy after that. If you are hunting a heavy traffic area, I've seen deer just work there way around hunters without being spotted. I once saw a big tall 4x4 slip behind a hunter about 50 yards from him, I was on top of a mountain glassing , way too far me to give chase. If you catch a whiff that smells like your at a goat farm, deer probably frequent that area a bunch.

These are just a few things I noticed while out on the field, that have helped me. Might not be the same all the time but it's happened plenty for me. Good Luck, back at it tomorrow morning.
 

longbowhunter2

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Some more game pics
Find an area that you feel is good Muley habitat. Scout it and make sure the sign is there. Then find the highest point that will give you a good view of a wide area and start glassing. It might take a week of glassing an area different times of day before you might see deer if the experience is not there and in some cases even if it is. I would say the best for me is in the morning .Once you learn the routes and the activity of the deer in your area the game is on. You will start to pick em out like $100 bills!!! There can be a wash that has no deer activity and 2 washes over might be a deer freeway for whatever reason. Glass all year long because it keeps you on your game and you can really get the deer activity locked in your area and for me it feels good to watch the deer even if it is not season. In the off season I glass high up on the nasty ridges and occasionally will catch a glimpse of some stud buck walking a ridge. The does in my area usually stay low and can usually find them all year long. So once the season comes along it's like you studied all year long for the test and your confidence should be there. You never want to scout during the season all your gonna do is leave your scent every where and put the deer into night mode.once the rut kicks in those bucks will start to come down from those hell holes and Cali ridges!!! It is possible and it is a challenge to get em high in those ridges too! It can really put you to the test though and I wouldn't recommend it to any one new to hunting. Go get em fellas!!!
X2 Bump, old game Camera pic
Never saw this guy on weekends
And during daylight. IMG_0056.JPG
 

longbowhunter2

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Oct 16, 2013
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All great info guys, I will for sure note some of these tips down.

Things I've noticed...
If a buck is bumped and not really spooked that bad (you didn't scream.. A BUCK! A BUCK! to your buddy across the ravine) they might stay close by but are a very jumpy after that. If you are hunting a heavy traffic area, I've seen deer just work there way around hunters without being spotted. I once saw a big tall 4x4 slip behind a hunter about 50 yards from him, I was on top of a mountain glassing , way too far me to give chase. If you catch a whiff that smells like your at a goat farm, deer probably frequent that area a bunch.

These are just a few things I noticed while out on the field, that have helped me. Might not be the same all the time but it's happened plenty for me. Good Luck, back at it tomorrow morning.
Hi Rick
Great write up. Thanks
Best
Longbow
 

longbowhunter2

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Since I am stuck on the couch LOL again. I have utilize my time reading.

Guess what is? Yep deer hunting.
It runs deep in my blood.
It came to me. WOw I have not scored in while. And I thought, I lost the knack. While this may be true I lost my way. Times have changed.
The young hunters have a head start
From the wealth of information that this very experienced hunters are giving.
Guess even this old dog has learned
Some new tricks. And keeping an open mind then digest all info.
And learn from these very informative post.
Where did this saying come from?
There is more than one way to skin a cat.
But it is true. I got tunnel vision.
Hey it use to work. No it doesn't any more. I have to change and adapt.
Now if this body with to much mileage would cooperate.
The information is a game changer.
All you young hunters are very lucky
These old timers share what has taken years of trial and error
And willing to share.
So what I am taking about!
This sharing of information about 20 years ago would have been awesome.
Remember upon failure there is success. Thing is take this failure.
And learn from it. I hear the successful hunts. And it is all good.
Because we all succeeded.
Best to all
Longbow
P.S. I need to get back out there.
It's the native thing to connect with earth. Being in the woods, with the giant pines, fresh air, and nature
Nothing like it.
 

longbowhunter2

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ok i am going to talk black science here for a second.... along what LP says about looking for parts of deer.

Your brain is very good at picking out shapes and colors and letting you know if even at a subconscious level that something is there. Ever have that feeling you are being watched only to look over and find that you are? The same thing works for hunting! Your brain can pick out the little parts of critters sticking out from a bush or in a hole and whamo you see game.

So how do you get your eyes and brain to work together do this little trick? Only one way, HUNT 365 days a year. The only way i have found to keep this skill sharp is spend a LOT of time outside. When i coyote hunt i hunt for everything. When i am working in a area that has deer i am constantly looking. Drive a canyon to work? look for deer. Get out and hike and find every game animal you can find. pretty soon your brain will do it with out you even trying. I think your brain processes more of your peripheral vision that current science says. You will find if you do this enough that your subconscious brain starts yelling at your conscious brain to look left stupid a deer is there and sometimes at amazing distance. The only way i know of to condition your brain for this is through repeated exposure to LOTS of deer. Think a walk in Cuyamaca state park is wast of time? Wrong its the best place to work on this. Lots of deer all over the place and just because you cant kill in the park does not mean you can not practice the skills.

Another part of the trick is to relax and let your amazing eyes do their work. What i mean by that is if you are so intently looking under every rock with your binos you brain goes into a bit of a tunnel vision mode where it blocks out everything but the tiny field of view you are so focused on. There are times that is ok like when you are in a spotting scope or when you know a deer is behind a bush and you take your time and pick apart every inch. When i start to glass a new area i first let my eyes scan the whole area. Relax and let all the info flood in. Let your brain pick out the detail with out focusing hard on any one spot. Remember you are wired to pick out shapes and color, it can be as small as a one square inch patch of fur that gives up the location of a whole animal . Once i have scanned with my bare eyes i start to glass. I cover a whole area semi quick. using the same trick of letting the animal jump out at me. When that fails i will start the grid and search more focused under every tree or bush. better than 75% of the time i pick up the animals with my bare eye or the quick look in the binos.

So RELAX and Calm your thoughts and you will see more deer.
X2 Aeon
Very well explained
Thanks
Longbow
 
Sep 18, 2018
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Here are some of my tips I made into youtube/podcasts for hunters. These are from my experience hunting blacktail deer in western Oregon but can transfer over to most mule and whitetail deer hunting everywhere. Maybe not as much to desert deer hunting. Hoping to start learning that myself starting this year.

Deer Hunting Tips & Tactics

Treestands and Blinds

Shed Hunting
 

NBK

Trying to be the man my dog thinks I am.
Mar 8, 2011
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Here are some of my tips I made into youtube/podcasts for hunters. These are from my experience hunting blacktail deer in western Oregon but can transfer over to most mule and whitetail deer hunting everywhere. Maybe not as much to desert deer hunting. Hoping to start learning that myself starting this year.

Deer Hunting Tips & Tactics

Treestands and Blinds

Shed Hunting


Pimp...
 

TheGDog

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Nov 28, 2018
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Another thing I didn't see mentioned in this thread so far... is shiny parts! If you see anything that's moderately shiny, that you don't immediately recognize as one of the certain types of plants on that area that you've noticed can have a shiny sorta look to them. Take a second and verify with your glass what that is.

While ideally you want the sun at your back while glassing optimally, that's not always going to be the case you're presented with. When that isn't the case... their fur, ears, antlers and especially noses will have a shine if any part of them happens to not be in the shade. Like when the morning is still cold and how you could imagine that you too would want to find somewhere that felt relatively safe... where you could stand for a second and let the sun warm you up after a cold night.

More often than not though... it's gonna be an ear-flick or a tail-flick that will happen, and, for me anyway... my eyes will SNAP over to that motion and in your head it's like "Gotcha B!tch!"

And in regards to seeing more deer. During your hike-in... especially as you're approaching legal beginning shooting time and there is starting to be enough light... LOOK UP!!! As you start approaching your intended area, focus on getting in there as freakin' Ninja quiet as you can pull-off! (which in someplaces is pretty much friggin impossible, but slowing way down can dramatically reduce the noise you make)

It's easy to fall into this sort of "heads-down" mode when you're trudging along on the hike-in and hike-out. If you let yourself fall into that trap, I gaurantee you there's a bunch of stuff you're missing seeing. Things that are hearing you approaching a bit of a distance away and are sneakin' out of there because of it.

Also... pay keen attention to your hearing! With time you'll get good about judging whether that sound you heard nearby was the sound of a smaller animal rustling thru the "potato-chips", or whether it *could* be something large enough to be a deer. That way you are not constantly trying to turn your head to look at it unless it sounds like something notable. This will lead to less movement on your part, which will lead to less chance that something which has entered the area of your ambush, but you don't know it's there yet, will see you first.

And in general... can't stress this enough... if you're not out there BEFORE the sun comes up and don't stay out there until AFTER the sun has gone completely down, meaning you're hiking back AFTER legal shooting light, you're not gonna see SH!T !

Where I've been going, it's crazy thick. And you can be glassing over an open meadowy area in the middle of it multiple times as it's approaching sundown... then..almost magically... a deer will appear from a spot you've specifically looked at and it'll be like it just emerged out of the very earth itself! It's such a trip!

And if you are positioned such that they would be able to see you and your glass at your current location. You *can* still get away with remaining there and glassing them, as long as when you go to reach your hand up to your optic... you do so incredibly and agonizingly slowly. I've tested this. Had a Mama Doe's faced pointed right at my sit location. Watched her and her kids feeding for 1hr 45min. (I got her to look over by Mimic'ing the call of a Mourning Dove) While she was looking dead in my direction... I was able to reach up with my hands and loosen and reposition slightly the ball-head of my tripod since they'd moved down a bit along that area. The key was in being able to move the hands Ninja slow. Painstakingly slow. Was also eventually able to hold up my cellphone by hand and snap some pics of them too when they were more busy feeding. I was maybe 100+yds away only.
 
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