Looking for people to tag along with

TheGDog

Active Member
Nov 28, 2018
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West Garden Grove
#21
Whoo lawdy!! Preach it man!

There are good traits to be found in both parties though.

Just that the Dems over the past 4 decades have lost their damn minds in terms of "free isht" and doubling-down on going hard-in-the-paint at woo'ing brand-new citizens over to their side by promising them all kinds of "Free" isht. It should be made against the law for any politician to be able to use the word "Free" in any communications pertaining to governance. There IS NO FREE!!!

Similarly Republicans need to kick any and all ties with Religion to the curb. And repubs do seem to have this annoying habit of working in big-a$$ tax loopholes for themselves. And they do tend to way overdo it in terms of spending money on military budget. And they really need to get a grip in terms of getting with the program of allowing weed to just be legal countrywide. The only reason that whole thing is still even an issue (such as on the 4473) is because of their strong ties with the Religious idiots. And probably because Big Pharma is lining their pockets nicely also. It's just dumb though. And worst part? Dems are cashing in on that stance repubs take in order to keep Kali on Blue lock-down! You get this idiot of Newsom... that's all he talks about... "Assault" weapons (N***a please!), stuff to make it easier for illegals, which makes new voters for them... and promises of legalization to get the stoner vote. Meanwhile he's a Gerry Brown Protege so he's going to continue the trend of Tax and Spend. And OMG!!!... now.. they even slapped taxes onto us without even giving it a vote! Then... what they do put it to a vote to repeal it... they make sure to use double-negatives in he sentences to describe the isht so that all these 'tards get confused and vote against it! I couldn't believe it when the repeal of that didn't get passed!
 

Robertp75

New Member
Dec 1, 2018
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#22
What did you get for a rifle?

Oh... BTW.. that have that same self-adhering camo wraps for your rifle. They work great. Just remember that if you ever get caught in the rain... when you get home... take them off!!! And Clean, dry and re-oil the metal. Otherwise it's holding moisture against the metal and makes it rust!

Eventually you'll need to take them off and do that stuff anyway because the sweat and oils from your hands will get into the fabric and that can also cause rust to form.
https://www.remington.com/rifles/bolt-action/model-783/model-783-walnut-w-scope this is my rifle. sorry for the late response, I've been taking notes on everything youve been tellling me. i really do appreciate everything you have taught me!
 

TheGDog

Active Member
Nov 28, 2018
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West Garden Grove
#23
Shoot... I hope for you they've addressed the issue with the magazines. Allowing the cartridges sometimes having more than one pop-off the top of the 783's magazine when working the bolt when the magazine is completely full. My .223 Rem 783 has that problem at times. Seems to happen more if the ammo uses nice and smooth nickel-plated cases too. However, it is a very accurate shooter for me, so oh well.
 

Robertp75

New Member
Dec 1, 2018
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#24
How do I know where to go to scout? Since pig is year-round I wanted to hunt pig to start with. I heard Kern has a decent amount of wild pig but I don't know where to start looking. Do I start by finding trails to hike? do I try to climb mountains to get a better view of the land? Are places surrounded by trees good?
 
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SurfNHuntSD

Well-Known Member
Oct 1, 2013
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San Diego
#25
How do I know where to go to scout? Since pig is year-round I wanted to hunt pig to start with. I heard Kern has a decent amount of wild pig but I don't know where to start looking. Do I start by finding trails to hike? do I try to climb mountains to get a better view of the land? Are places surrounded by trees good?
Loaded question. I'd start by getting familiar with your public land options.. National Forests, BLM, and CDFW areas. Get OnXMaps and hard copy maps and then cross reference with Google Earth to identify areas to scout that are legal. I know nothing about pigs on public land up there but it's probably tough hunting, so I'd recommend a guided hunt if pigs are your thing.

Sent from my SM-G965U using Tapatalk
 

TheGDog

Active Member
Nov 28, 2018
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West Garden Grove
#26
I don't have much Pig experience. But I do know what "rooting" looks like, and have seen it for myself firsthand. And been to Fort Hunter Liggett with a guy and he pointed out the kinda terrain/vegetation attributes you'd expect to find Pigs in in that area. We even saw one sprint across the road in the dark when we were entering into the area before sunrise. I've gone a couple of times to Central CA, I think it was somewhere off the 46 Hwy if I recall. With one guy there was this patch of BLM land he knew about that to get to it you had to drive down a long road that went between two private properties that had cattle of I recall, and apparently though it was legal to do so... if they saw ya he said they just might try to get the law to hassle ya, something like that? So we ended-up driving down that road arriving at night, and also leaving at night 2 days later as well. And he was using waypoints he'd previously marked on his GPS to guide us into there in the black of night. So not like I'd be able to know how to get back into there anyway.

Another outing was with a guy based out of Bakersfield, and we road-tripped again on that 46 then up the 101 over to Kings City and then over to the Laguna Mountain Recreation Area I think was the name of the area? It's this public land area that butts up against buncha privately owned vineyard country on the other side of the mountain/hill.

P.S. Holy fvckballs! The fog that comes in to Bakersfield via that Hwy 46 is thee most intense thickest densest fog at butt-thirty in the morning that I've ever seen in my life! When travelling around there be prepared to have to deal with that fog. I literally had to, at one point, stop...open my door... and look down to verify I was still beside the painted line on the road, it was THAT BAD! It was seriously slow going while driving thru all this Orchard country until finally getting past that fog into the more open and lonely parts of that 46 Hwy.

I would do some studying on what kinda habitats they tend to inhabit. I mean obviously the typical high-desert rolling grasslands like terrain around Fort Tejon obviously must work. I seem to recall they DO need water to visit that they can wallow in.
 
Likes: Dawnandusk

longbowhunter2

Well-Known Member
Oct 16, 2013
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on the mountain
#27
Let's cut to the Bone.
Start with practicing at the range with new rifle. Crawl first.
Pick up the best you can afford binos. Good all around 10x42 vortex or Leupold to start out.

Good hunting boots are a must.
A good knife
A starter back pack
Bladder style water
There you go.
Since you are a newbie if you really want to go pig hunting.
Go guided hunt. Save money for it.
Learn from the pros.
You have to experience it first hand. From experience hunters.

I recommend start out with small game and upland game.

If you hook up with an experience hunter that's even better.
Either way you need to get out in the woods.
LB
 

Dawnandusk

Active Member
Sep 26, 2018
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Bonita
#32
At first for Binos, either 8x or 10x, (PS, make sure at least 42mm!!) cause ya figure you're going to be using them hand-held. I usually use 8x's because they are easier to hand-hold and easier to get on target with for checking something that you *think* might be an animal. Normally though... just wait and keep watching, and if no movement at all.. more than likely it's just vegetation... yet again... messing with your mind and making itself look like something you're wishing was there.

Get in the habit of putting the lense covers back on after each use. Not as important of the objective ends since they hang off your bino harness and point downward, but on the eyepiece ends its definitely helpful, cause sweat will drip onto em otherwise.

Water: Platypus Big Zip 3 liter is most economical while still having all the features you need. I also use Vapur water-bag-bottles as well. to Carry a liter or two of either water or amino recovery stuff already mixed up. They are nice to have once already at your sit. They are easier to drink from quietly, and as they empty, you get back space in your pack! DO NOT hang one of those on your hip if you're working thru nasty buck-brush! It WILL pierce them. ALSO... another benefit of having the extra water-bags with me is that if you have a main bag fail on you and develop a leak. You're not completely screwed. You at least have some other water to get you back outta there. Running out of water is terribly freightening business. You DO NOT wanna go there!

Goto REI and buy those Eagle Creek super thin nylon zippered bags they have for organizing the stuff you're going to take in your pack.

In one I do medicines. Allergy eye drops, Imodium (ALWAYS TAKE THIS!) I get Acid Reflux easy so I always take Zantac's. I take breath-right strips and Zrytec pills as well. Helps me to not sniff out there where I go because at times there can be a sh1t-ton of irritants in the air. Pollen, Bark, I dunno. Lip Balm. And a small tube of Preparation-H. Don't laugh, with all that sitting, you couple that with having a bad day in terms of going #2 (remember the Imodium?) . Some sports cushioned blister tape. Using a small one of those bags I keep that on my hip belt. In another one I keep in the pack I have Quick-Clot and self-adhering Gauze roll, and several of the largest sized waterproof adhesive bandages. ALWAYS bring AT LEAST two different forms of lights source! And make sure to bring extra batteries for both of them! I also have hats and beanies that have LED lights built into them. They are very cool for when you're in the tent looking for something, or when you get back to the truck and are putting stuff away. Make sure your headlamp has a low a high and a red beam. A low beam of like around 40 lumens is usually all I ever use because I'm paranoid about running out of light when out there and they usually can run like 8 or 9 hrs on that low setting. If you can... its better to find a backup flashlight with a clip that can clasp to your caps visor if possible. They are not as common to find though.

In another larger zippered bag I have my kill-kit. The envelope with your hunting license and the tags in it, a pen. a ziploc with a healthy number of 14" zip-ties in it. A small ziploc with 3 or 4 pairs of Nitrile gloves in it.

You need a Havalon replaceable scalpel blade type knife for processing the animal. They don't weigh anything and ya can bring a few more blades along. Look on YouTube and watch how to do "Gutless Method" for removing the meat from the deer. Watch this video MANY times at first. Pay special attention to how to get at the Tenderloins! You don't want to mess up and leave this behind because you didn't know any better! You're also going to need another traditional knife to backup this one. I use a more traditional knife for making those cuts where the knife blade will be scraping across bone, such as separating the foreleg at the knee joint, and when making that backstrap cut where you're sliding your knife along the rib cage. The initial cut beside the vertebrae I do that with the Havalon. Also I use the more traditional knife for separating the skull from the spine at the Atlas joint. Watch videos about doing that too! You're going to need a multi-tool so you can have Pliers and a Screwdriver with you as well. I've had to tighten-up the screws in my Tripod stool more than a few times. The pliers with wire cutters can be helpful for cutting snapping-off a bunch of annoying branches that are poking into you where you're backed up into a tree for your sit. Also the pliers are a neat way to snap off a Rabbits feet and head when cleaning them! (Just did that last night actually!). These days in my pocket I carry a Leatherman Skeletool CX. Gives me pliers, screw driver and a knife to backup the Havalon, and only weighs 5oz.

Also in the kill-kit you're going to need game bags. People will tell you you can just bring pillow cases. It'll work, but that's dumb. They are "heavy" and bulky. What I now bring that works phenomenal? Kifaru (a company that makes high-end hunting packs and other hunting gear) has these meat bags that are crazy light and tuff! I put the meat in one of those... (it holds it into a nice tall cylindrical shape that easy to fit in your pack) and I use an Alaskan game bag for the hide and skull. I zip-tie the game bag onto the antlers to close it and ensure it won't come off in transit.

Always throw-in at least one microfiber wash-cloth into your hunting pack. When clean, they can wipe your optics. And... give you something to help wipe your hands and knives clean with when you get lucky. BTW, re cleaning your hands or stuff in the field. Learn how to put water into your mouth... then spit out a thin stream of it to efficiently allow you to rinse stuff off without wasting much water at all.

Buy a Klymit Kush inflatable sit pad. Even though you'll probably get a Tripod stool that you'll bring with you for your sit... you can get real sore from the long hours on the darn thing and being able to introduce that inflatale pad you can move around every so often is really helpful.

At some point... you will likely encounter a scenario where a tree has fallen over onto a trail you're wanting to proceed on... and it happens at a place where there might not be safe options in terms of going around it. So having at least a small slim folding pocket bone saw and a super lightweight pack hatchet can prove helpful. I have an 11oz Elk Ridge pack hatchet. I wrapped Hockey Stick/Tennis Racket grip tape around its handle. Works great. (You just have to understand how to use one properly. And understand that if its something sizeable, it could take a bit to chop at it enough to where you can break it off.) I recently had to bore a whole thru 3 trees that fell onto the trail at a point where the detour is very cliff-like. So on one of my trips out there I decided to leave a little early in the pm and spent some time hacking thru it just enough so that I could crawl thru it with my pack still on and didn't have to expose myself to the huge risk of going around on that cliff-like side anymore (and on the other side is a very sheer rock face so going that route would require back-tracking down the trail and finding some spot where I could get up there and all kindsa bad noise so I said to myself bump that.

You'll want a separate zippered bag also for storing your hard plastic cathole digger on some pouch on the outside of your pack. Besides doing the polite thing of burying your waste, they can be helpful for flattening out the spot where you're going to pitch your tent at. Digging out rocks and weeds, etc so the surface can be flat.

I always wear camo'd liner gloves. Keep your hands from getting sun-burnt. ALWAYS bring a pair of colder weather gloves too! I always bring an extra pair of liner socks and Merino wool socks. At hot days, it gives you some non-sweatied up socks to change over into so your feet don't get as hurt. When your socks get wet the fibers can be rough/murder on your skin. On cold days... if your sokcs happen to manage to get wet (like stepping into an area that you didn't know was like quick-sand...yeah... that actually happened!) you have another dry pair to swap into.

Also... they have these paracord bracelet things with click closures. Get one of those also. they are a great way to ensure that something you're tying onto the outside of your pack doesn't get lost if the tying straps should come undone. You have that paracord thing running thru something of the item and clicked throw some kind of loop on your bag. This works really good when sending your kids away on a campout with scouts too. Teaching them to secure the whatever to their bag with those paracord bracelets. And..ya know.. if you ever get in a jam, it's alos more paracord at your disposal.

RE: Snack foods - Honey Stinger Waffles!!! Squeezable Applesauces are a bit of a luxury but quick and easy and very refreshing. The rest I'll leave up to you. I get acid reflux easy so I have to spend a lot of time finding what works decently for me.

Also... lil side note. I store my GPS inside a thin tube of microfiber cloth so screen doesn't get scratched in the pack. When I transport trailcams I put em into thick knee high Moto/Soccer socks also for same reason so they don't get scratched.

You'll also need to get yourself an Ammo wallet so you can store more rounds in your pack.

When you get your BearSpray, make sure the holster it has for it has some kind of retention strap, otherwise what happens is when you sit down on a rock for a second out on the trail... or plop down on the ground in the shade of a tree because you're dying from heat... the damn BearSpray canister will silently slip right out of a holster with no retention strap on it. No bueno.
Amazing writing...
Many of us, newbies, search for this information for years and we appreciate it greatly when someone shares his/her knowledge.
We need to increase the number of hunters in our country, teaching the new members of our community how to get prepared and what to expect helps to keep the numbers going up, otherwise we tend to get discouraged and abandon the sport.
I have found a few good hunters in San Diego that are providing me with knowledge, knowledge that I am passing down to my son. I used to go hunting with my dad when I was a child. I learned more from him in an afternoon than what I have learned in any other way in years.

After reading your advise for Robert and everybody else in this group, I can't imagine going alone carrying all that weight on your back.
 
Likes: ivhunter

TheGDog

Active Member
Nov 28, 2018
106
94
28
West Garden Grove
#34
After reading your advise for Robert and everybody else in this group, I can't imagine going alone carrying all that weight on your back.

You just have to make some wiser decisions to help you counter-act the need for a bit of weight. Such as stashing water in a location ahead of time. Or hiking in BEFORE the sun comes up, and... especially if the trail you used is exposed to sun the whole route... waiting until last-light before making the hike back out. Makes a HUGE difference in your water demand.

There's a huge difference in carrying lotsa stuff in the sun, vs carrying in cool temps. And when I've gotten lucky and have to pack-out an animal... so far... I've opted to leave behind the tent/sleepingbag/airpad/etc. And just hike-out the meat, then hike back in to fetch the other stuff later once the sun goes down. It's a little harder on the feet that way. But I'm being more realistic with the demands I'm putting on my lower back that way. I *have* to dope-up when packing-out an animal. Not much... but I DO need some help from meds due to an old Lower back Trauma. And really.. the doping-up is more so that the next day I'm not all screwed and hobbled,... as much.

It kinda all depends on the terrain really. One of the things I like about the main place I've been going to is that I don't usually see anybody else at all, because it's just enough of an exertion on the hike-in... that most people are like bump that, I'm turning back. Which works heavily in your favor when you're in a zone surrounded by 21 Million people.

Besides... regarding "carrying all that weight on your back". I just look at it like it's helping my body prepare for the day I get lucky is all. And I mean... when you get lucky... if I have to... I *can* just say screw it and take as long as I want to get myself back out of there, ya know? One spot in Angeles is all downhill going in there... which means it's all uphill going out. It's pretty brutal for a desk-jockey like I am these days. So for that one... naw man.. bump that... I wait until the sun is going down before I start the long uphill.

Anyhoo.... I work from home... so I'm trapped in a room all damn day. I *need* the exercise. So I just look at it like needed work I gotta do. When I'm doing overnighters I do tend to get more frugal when making choices of what to put in the pack, where I can. But I mean... shoot man... going out solo... I dunno.. I feel like it's shame on me if I end up not bringing something that I wind up desperately needing. I tell people all the damn time.. shoot.. I know my luck, Jack! That's why I don't take chances and come prepared. I gotta mouth to feed for another 7 years, and another something like 20 years on the mortgage. I ain't gettin' caught slippin' man. Nope! Best Believe Papa-san's getting himself home each and every time. Broken appendages and all!
 
Sep 19, 2018
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#35
Very good information I got stuck reading all of it . I'm up for looking for a pig Robert never went out for one but doing alot of research on it and some places. Let me know if you want to meet up sometime
 
Oct 24, 2018
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#36
Great detailed write up GDog.

Something I want to add about trimming bushes, trees, etc. out in the field. This is something I've recently started doing a little bit of for all game in most all areas and I try to keep at small hand clipper in the side pocket of my pack. If a pathway is too overgrown for you to get though comfortable chances are many large game animals feel the same way. Some birds flushed between two bushes but this odd branch sticking out screwed up the shot? Clip it off so it doesn't happen twice. While your out there you may as well take a little time to improve the area for the game and your ability

Pigs. Haven't gotten one in years so don't but much weight into what I'm saying. Most people say to hire a guide and go private and that is good sound advice and can learn a lot in a short time. On the other hand there is something to be learned by going out on public and trying too but I think you really need to research and study some very specific target areas to even find sign to where it is worth while and you don't feel like your wandering around aimlessly for something that is not there at all. The last few times I was out I found some sign but ultimately concluded that the pigs would mostly reside on the neighboring private area or on the very difficult to access public on the other side that needed to be accessed from a completely different way. Getting it done on public I'm anticipating is going to take a lot of time, effort, and work to either get lucky or dial in to a secret spot.

For new hunters I generally think a shotgun is a better entry tool into hunting as you'll have much more options, time, areas, and likely success to introduce your self into the activity. You can get you hands dirty field dressing smaller things before tackling something large etc. It's a good way to get yourself out in the field more, areas will be closer, and since your out there it's a good way to keep your eyes open for spots for deer.

As far as the stuff you bring with you goes I like to try and keep it as basic as I can but I'm pretty terrible at prehunt prep. I'm not a fan of the getting your stuff ready process so the less I can get by with the easier that process will be, the less stuff I buy, and the less junk I'm carrying. Plus not having something can be a good way to determine what things you really need. Hopefully it's not something critical like water but yes that happens too and you'll have to turn around early when you misjudge that one. Then get a horrible migraine anyways because you had to hike the last mile dehydrated in the sun without water because you still didn't turn around soon enough. I still find myself bring stuff I don't need and forgetting things I do.

I hear a lot of guys say you'll have to do it solo at first.
Which means a lot of guys are hesitant to take on a new person not really knowing who they are, where they are, what they're willing to do, if their fitness is a good mesh, do they want to learn or do they want to be shown, etc etc etc. And at the same time I think sitting down in person with a new hunter and going out to a new to both place could really accelerate the learning process.
 
Oct 26, 2018
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#37
X8... or whatever
Excellent information in this thread GDog.
Educational, informative, descriptive, colorful, entertaining, and inspirational!
Impressive stuff, if you quit your day job you could easily transition to editorials or short stories!
Also, appreciate the additional commentary, knowledge drop, from the other experienced view points.

As for the 783 rifle, same that I recently picked up. No Mag issues on mine, have only heard / read a few reports of this problem. Mine in .270 shoots very accurate out of the box, and was quick to sight in, now I'm just figuring what ammo brand/type I like best with it. Definitely invest in a better scope though, but wouldn't spend too much more on additional mods beyond that. It is what it is, a no frills, entry level budget hunting rifle that shoots accurate out of the box and comes in all the popular ammo flavors (given you have no mfg defects). Stick a decent scope on it, add a sling, and be done with it.

-Robert
 
Nov 28, 2018
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West Garden Grove
#38
Thanks for that note about your 783. I may have to just reachout to them then. I'm bettin' they caught wind of it and probably tweaked how their mags are designed a lil bit I'd imagine. But yeah, like I said though, definitely accurate shooter.
 
Oct 26, 2018
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#39
Thanks for that note about your 783. I may have to just reachout to them then. I'm bettin' they caught wind of it and probably tweaked how their mags are designed a lil bit I'd imagine. But yeah, like I said though, definitely accurate shooter.
Off topic, but...
Most of the mag issues I have read about the 783 have to do with the bolt NOT grabbing the round as you engage it. There is some wiggle/movement of the mag, so the tolerances aren't the best. I read an example of where 1 individual bent the rearward facing metal mag latch lip a little and that helped keep the mag in tighter. Another would press the mag up/in when sliding the bolt and found success with that.
Thinking out loud, I wonder if it is an ammo size issue, would be interested in knowing of the mag issues experienced, what ammo calibers they were.
One thing I did notice on my 783 is that it does not like fat bullets. The slimmer/tapered bullet rounds feed in really well. Tried federal non-typical .270 win rounds, which are more of a rounded fat snub nose style and it was hard to fully seat the bullet. Initially, I couldn't even get them to seat at all, cleaned the barrel really good at bullet seat and now I can seat them with some effort, but haven't been to the range with this ammo yet to see if it will loosen up. Mic'd the bullet diameter and the fed non-typical are .28 ish with a longer extended consistent size base before rounding… the tapered style were all .27ish and tapered quickly from the base to a point. So either the 'fatter' bullet base or the fact that the base length is longer probably explains why I am having issues with this specific ammo load....